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Posted by on Oct 8, 2014 in Elder Abuse, Legislation Affecting Seniors, Long-term Care, Seniors First San Diego, Sharon Lee |

FACT SHEET: NEW LAW REQUIRES ADDITIONAL TRAINING REQUIREMENTS FOR RCFE ADMINISTRATORS AND STAFF

Click here for printable fact sheet: SB 911 (Block) Residential care facilities for the elderly

Background: The California Department of Social Services (CDSS) oversees licensing and regulation of Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly (RCFEs). RCFEs are also known as assisted living facilities, retirement homes, and board and care homes. RCFEs provide housing and services to persons 60 years of age and over and persons under 60 with compatible needs. RCFE employees supervise and assist older adults with activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing.

Old law: A license applicant and RCFE administrator is required to complete a certification program, which includes a minimum of 40 hours of classroom instruction. The certification is valid for two years and recertification requires 40 hours of continuing education. Staff members who provide direct care must receive 10 hours of initial training within the first four weeks of employment and at least 4 hours annually.

Issue: Over 7,500 RCFEs with 174,000 beds are licensed with CDSS. These facilities now serve more residents with serious health problems and higher levels of dementia than in previous years. Although residents’ health care needs are greater, many administrators and direct care staff do not have sufficient qualifications and training to meet the residents’ particular needs, which may place RCFE residents at risk.

New law: RCFE administrators training requirements are increased from 40 to 80 hours. Facilities must employ trained medical personnel if residents with certain health conditions are accepted and retained. Direct staff employees must complete an increased number of hours of initial training, either 24 hours or 10 hours, depending on the number of residents. Facilities are prohibited from retaliating against an employee or resident who calls 911 when a resident is injured and in need of medical care.